In June 2020, Beijing inserted national security legislation directly into Hong Kong’s mini-constitution – bypassing the local legislature – following a year of pro-democracy protests and unrest. It criminalised subversion, secession, collusion with foreign forces and terrorist acts, which were broadly defined to include disruption to transport and other infrastructure. The move gave police sweeping new powers, alarming democrats, civil society groups and trade partners, as such laws have been used broadly to silence and punish dissidents in China. However, the authorities say it has restored stability and peace to the city.

LATEST NEWS & VIEWS

Explainer: How to measure Hong Kong’s mass exodus

Hong Kong has seen a mass exodus following the anti-extradition bill protests in 2019 and the implementation of the sweeping national legislation in June 2020. The city is once again seeing scenes like those in the years leading up to the Handover, with people packing up and starting a new life in a foreign country.…

COMMENTARY & ANALYSIS

Something to cheer after a dismal 2021? The Hongkongers who shunned the ‘patriots’ polls

Let’s hope most Hongkongers have some personal triumphs to celebrate when the clock strikes midnight to ring in 2022. Because, let’s face it, the city as a whole does not have much to crow about over the past year.  It’s been, to borrow a phrase once famously employed by Hong Kong’s former monarch, an annus horribilis.…

An introduction to mainland-style democracy – Hong Kong’s first election under national security rules

Congratulations to the production managers in Beijing and the campaign managers here. Together they have designed and orchestrated a new-style election system for Hong Kong that has succeeded in producing exactly the results they intended. Unlike the old legislature, this new one can safely contribute to the “administration” of Hong Kong without disrupting its “executive-led”…

MONTH BY MONTH DEVELOPMENTS

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FEATURES

‘Statues tell stories, but so does removing them’: Hong Kong’s 48-hour campus crackdown on the memory of the Tiananmen Massacre

It was around 5 a.m. on Christmas Eve when Lingnan University student Eric Tong heard someone pounding on the door of his dormitory room. Still half-asleep, the 23-year-old Hongkonger slowly got up and noticed his phone had been buzzing for minutes, as messages repeatedly popped up in a student union group chat.  There were more…

Interview: Nixie Lam stands firm for ‘One Country’ in Hong Kong’s first ‘patriots-only’ election

As one of only a few pro-Beijing figures in Hong Kong to have spoken in the august halls of the United Nations, Nixie Lam, a hopeful in Hong Kong’s first “patriots-only” election, is seen by many of her supporters as their “international spokesperson.” “It’s because I know English and I’m willing to speak English,” the…

Interview: Kiwi Chow sees his Cannes protest doc as an ’emotional vent’ for Hongkongers

Hong Kong director Kiwi Chow, who startled the city by premiering protest documentary Revolution of Our Times at the Cannes Festival last month, said he wants his film to act as an “emotional vent” for Hongkongers amid “trauma” from the 2019 unrests and fears arising from the national security law. The 152-minute documentary, which chronicled…

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