What could be better than a hike that starts at the beach and ends at the beach? Mui Wo to Pui O makes for a perfect summer day.

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

Start with a swim and a seafood feast in Mui Wo and end with a dip and dinner in Pui O, which is home to some of the best sunsets in Hong Kong.

But even during the winter season, Hong Kong waters are never too cold to swim in and the legendary Treasure Island Beach club is open year-round at the weekends. 

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

The Mui Wo to Pui O hike makes up Section 12 of the Lantau Trail. Totalling around eight kilometres, it’s a medium-difficulty hike that should take around two and a half to three hours to complete.

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

The highest point is Tai Ngau Wu peak at 275 metres, which is also the most difficult stint. 

How to hike from Mui to Pui O

The simplest way to start is from Mui Wo ferry pier. Either catch the Mui Wo ferry from Central Pier number 6 or take bus 3 or 3M from Tung Chung. The ferry runs roughly every half an hour at the weekends. 

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

Once you reach the ferry pier walk towards McDonald’s on your left and along the pier until you reach China Bear restaurant.

From here keep going straight, past a little bay with kayaks, which would be a great activity for another day. Just after the kayaks you’ll notice the entrance to Lantau Trail Section 12. That’s the starting point. 

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

The next few kilometres are easy and rewarding with beautiful coastal views. On a clear day you can see Hong Kong Island in the distance and Mui Wo bay’s blue waters.

Soon you’ll arrive at an intersection where one trail continues along the coast and the other turns into the forest.

For a longer, flatter hike, press on along the coastal route. For a shorter hike, with incredible views, follow the signs towards Pui O and turn right to head inland. As the trail continues, it becomes more challenging. Take your time and enjoy the scenery. There’s plenty of shade along the trail, which makes it fitting for even the sunniest summer day. 

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

After a few kilometres you’ll reach a short paved path. Once again turn right towards Pui O. Follow the road for a few minutes while keeping an eye out for signs to Pui O on your left. It’s a small dirt trail that’s easy to miss. 

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

In a short while you’ll reach Pak Fu Tin campsite. Take a breather here because the next part of the hike up to Tai Ngau Wu peak is the most challenging section.

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

Made up of a combination of steps and slopes, this one kilometre can be a killer. Take it slow and steady and remember that in less than an hour you’ll be relaxing on the beach. 

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

You’ll know you’ve reached the top of Tai Ngau Wu when you see a helipad and a grassy field. Enjoy the views of the surrounding mountains, Pui O straight ahead and Lamma to your left. It’s all downhill from here (in the best way). 

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

Continue along Lantau Trail Section 12 until you reach Chi Ma Wan road.

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

From here turn right and stick to the main road. In around 10 minutes you’ll reach Tin Hau Temple. From here you could continue along Chi Ma Wan road toward Pui O town, but we suggest you take off your socks and shoes, head down to the beach and walk the rest of the way to Pui O in the water. 

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

Pui O beach is grand and beautiful, with a long sandy patch and mountains in the distance. Enjoy the fruits of your labour and stick around for the sunset. There are hot showers and toilets available, and Treasure Island Beach club opens at 10am on weekends for dine-in and takeaway.

Photo: Tom Grundy/HKFP.

There’s also a campsite and barbecue pits near the beach if you want to turn this day hike into a camping trip.

Catch a bus or taxi from the main road to head back to Mui Wo or Tung Chung for onward transport.

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Teele Rebane

Teele Rebane is a final year journalism student at the University of Hong Kong.