Hong Kong’s Antiquities Authority has added three more historic buildings to its list of protected monuments, raising the number of protected sites in the city to 129.

Bonham Road Primary School. Photo: GovHK.

Announced on Friday, the declared monuments include a former teacher training school in Sai Ying Pun, a defunct police station in Tai Po from the 19th century, and a rebuilt Ming-dynasty era temple in Sha Tau Kok.

central spiral staircase with terrazzo finishes of the main building of Bonham Road Government Primary School. Photo: GovHK.

The building that now serves as the Bonham Road Government Primary School was built in the early 1940’s.

Bonham Road Primary School. Photo: GovHK.

Before it became a primary school in 2000, it had housed the city’s first teacher training centre and functioned as the headquarters of the Japanese Military Police during World War II.

Bonham Road Primary School. Photo: GovHK.

“The main building has been serving educational purposes since it was completed in 1941 and is a rare surviving example of school premises that have served both primary and tertiary institutions,” the announcement read.

Old Tai Po Police Station. Photo: GovHK.

The second addition, the Old Tai Po Police Station, was the first police station and headquarters to be established in the New Territories at the beginning of Britain’s 99-year-lease over the region.

Old Tai Po Police Station. Photo: GovHK.

Built in 1899, it is the oldest surviving police station in the territory. It has been revitalised as the “Green Hub” under a government scheme to promote conservation and sustainability.

Old Tai Po Police Station. Photo: GovHK.

The third site, Hip Tin Temple, was rebuilt in the mid-1890’s to replace a Ming-dynasty era temple to the Chinese deity Kwan Tai. The government cited the temple’s “significant historical value to the economic development” to the local community.

Hip Tin Temple. Photo: GovHK.

“[It] is one of the few surviving main temples associated with the Tung Wo Market operated by the village alliance Shap Yeuk, which dominated the economy of the Sha Tau Kok area from the 1830s to the 1930s.,” a government statement read.

Hip Tin Temple. Photo: GovHK.

The government can block and impose alterations it deems necessary to protected declared monuments.

Hip Tin Temple. Photo: GovHK.

Hong Kong has 1,444 historic buildings, 1,154 of which have been declared graded heritage buildings under government protection. Other declared monuments include Tin Hau temple in Causeway Bay and King’s College in the Mid-levels.

Rhoda Kwan

Rhoda Kwan is HKFP's Assistant Editor. She has previously written for TimeOut Hong Kong and worked at Meanjin, a literary journal. She holds a double bachelor’s degree in Law and Literature from the University of Hong Kong.