The demolition of Eiver House, one of the last remaining cornerhouses in Hong Kong, began earlier this year as part of the redevelopment of To Kwa Wan.

Eiver House. Photo: HKURBEX.

Cornerhouses are walk-up buildings with rounded corners. “While there are still a number of these corner buildings left, few are positioned on such a perfectly curved horseshoe bend and few hug the road as fittingly as this one,” said a member of HKURBEX.

Eiver House. Photo: HKURBEX.

“To tackle the growing need for land, the government allowed these buildings to serve dual functions as a way to maximise space at the time. Thus, they were not built to be aesthetic, but utilitarian.”

Eiver House. Photo: HKURBEX.

“The distinctive corner of To Kwa Wan which this curved building fronted will change forever. Hundreds of residents and shop owners were displaced and evicted by the Urban Renewal Authority (URA).”

Eiver House. Photo: HKURBEX.

“While urban renewal is important in old districts like this in Hong Kong, the URA should work more with communities to lessen the displacement pressures.”

Eiver House. Photo: HKURBEX.

“The burdens of the displacement are particularly notable for the elderly, ethnic minorities and immigrants.”

Photo: HKURBEX.

The group said that while Eiver House was demolished, some other cornerhouses, such as Lui Seng Chun in Prince Edward, were preserved.

Eiver House. Photo: HKURBEX.

“While one structure has succumbed to an architectural death, others have been given a new lease of life. Long live the curve,” said HKURBEX.

To Kwa Wan. Photo: HKURBEX.
Eiver House. Photo: HKURBEX.

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HK Urbex is a group of visual creators and storytellers on a mission to unearth Hong Kong's derelict abandoned sites.