The government imposed three coronavirus lockdowns in Chai Wan, Tuen Mun, and To Kwa Wan on Wednesday evening. Around 2,548 residents had undergone a test by 2am on Thursday, with one preliminary positive case uncovered.

Mee Wah Building in Chai Wan and Block 1 of Goodview Garden in Tuen Mun were put under a compulsory cordon at 7pm on Wednesday, whilst a lockdown in Block D of Honour Building in To Kwa Wan was imposed at 8.30pm.

Tuen Mun lockdown. Photos: Michael Ho and Kenny Huang/Studio Incendo.

No cases were found in To Kwa Wan or Chai Wan, but a preliminary positive case was detected in Tuen Mun. In all, Hong Kong recorded 19 coronavirus infections on Wednesday – all cases were locally transmitted and seven cases had unknown origins.

Gov’t facilities

Local media also reported on Wednesday that people visiting the Central Government Complex in Admiralty would be “strongly advised” to use the “LeaveHomeSafe” app to record their visit.

Government employees, visitors and reporters would need to use the app upon their entry to the building, or they would have to register with security staff.

The Leisure and Cultural Services Department has also announced a list of outdoor leisure facilities to be reopened next Tuesday.

Chai Wan lockdown. Photos: Michael Ho and Kenny Huang/Studio Incendo.

Facilities to be resumed include running tracks in sports grounds, tennis courts, bowling greens, gateball courts, Ngau Chi Wan Park Archery Range, Shek O Obstacle Golf Course, cycling facilities, outdoor badminton courts, outdoor table tennis tables, and parts of the Tuen Mun Recreation and Sports Centre. Other facilities will remain closed until further notice.

School arrangements

After the Lunar New Year holidays, all schools in Hong Kong will be allowed to let no more than one third of students back to campus up to half a day.

According to the government, if schools wish to resume full-day face-to-face teaching, teaching staff would have to take a coronavirus test every 14 days.

Photo: Kelly Ho/HKFP.

Tai Tak-ching, head of the Wan Chai District Headmasters’ Conference, slammed the government’s announcement on an RTHK radio show on Wednesday and said that he did not understand how it would make the campus safer that only teaching staff but not students were getting tested.

Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung defended the policy on Thursday and said the bureau’s suggestion was not intended to pressure principals.

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Candice Chau

Candice is a reporter at Hong Kong Free Press. She previously worked as a researcher at a local think tank. She has a BSocSc in Politics and International Relations from the University of Manchester and a MSc in International Political Economy from London School of Economics.