Hong Kong-based wildlife photographer Peter Yuen gave up the local rat race to become Asia’s top wildlife rescue photographer, working with welfare and conservation NGOs all over the continent to promote their causes. In 2015 alone he worked with 14 charities in five countries, covering six rescues and working with countless species.

Frank the Sun Bear at Free the Bears sanctuary in Cambodia, after his rescue from poachers.

A baby elephant, just a few hours old, at a project in Nepal supported by Elephant Aid International.

A baby orangutan hangs on for survival in Sumatra, where his habitat is under threat from palm oil plantations. Taken on a research trip for Hong Kong-­based EARS Asia.

Moon bear Shamrock during her rescue by Hong Kong-­based Animals Asia at their China Bear Rescue Centre.

One of Hong Kong’s threatened species, the Chinese White Dolphin off Lantau Island, on a trip with the Hong Kong Dolphin Conservation Society.

Rescued moon bear Wan Chai at Animals Asia’s China Bear Rescue Centre.

Pangolins are found throughout Asia and are still occasionally sighted in Hong Kong. This mother and pangopup were rescued in Cambodia by Wildlife Alliance.

Rescued elephant Naamfon spends her first night of freedom by a fire and under the stars at Boon Lott’s Elephant sanctuary in Thailand.

Free the Bears cared for this one­-week old sun bear cub in Cambodia after it was rescued from poachers to be sold as a pet.

A binturong rescued by Save Vietnam’s Wildlife in Northern Vietnam. Binturongs are known for their distinctive “popcorn” smell.

Moon bear Manuka was kept in a cage for around ten years, before being rescued by Animals Asia. This photo was taken exactly one year after her rescue.

Hong Kong-­based EARS Asia cared for Seila the elephant for two years. Seila is now the figurehead of a campaign to close one of Asia’s worst zoos, where she currently resides.

Staff at the ACCB in Cambodia had to hand rear this silvered langur until it was strong enough to be released.

Hong Kong’s famous buffalo are a beautiful addition to the countryside, sadly set to be gone within a few generations. The Lantau Buffalo Association does what it can to protect these giants.

Sugar gliders can still be found for sale (illegally) in Hong Kong. Wildlife Alliance confiscated a small box containing around 100 sugar gliders (many of them already dead) in Cambodia as they were being transferred to Thailand, Asia’s hub of the illegal wildlife trade.

No matter how old they are, all dogs are welcome to take part in the annual “Wag’n’Walk” events held in Hong Kong by the SPCA.

Peter is supported by crowdfunding via his Patreon page. Check out more of his work at peteryuenphotography.com.

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